Author Biographies

Dorian Borbonus, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, University of Dayton, Ohio.

Bio Page
http://www.udayton.edu/artssciences/profiles/borbonus_dorian.php

Professor Borbonus teaches courses in ancient Greek and Roman history at the University of Dayton, but his training is in Mediterranean archaeology. He likes to combine history and archaeology in the classroom and in his research.

Mark Davison

Bio Page
http://archaeologicalmappinglab.org

Master Planning Coordinator, Oregon Parks & Recreation Department.
Director of Historic Landscapes, Archaeological Mapping Lab, University of Arizona.

Elisha Ann Dumser, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, University of Akron, Ohio.

Bio Page
http://www.uakron.edu/art/our-people/bio-detail.dot?identity=4f930a99-943c-40ca-af4f-833b15977f15
Email
edumser@uakron.edu

Professor Dumser teaches pre-20th century art history courses, and is the area coordinator for art history. Her research focuses on Roman art and architecture, especially Late Antiquity.

Andrew B. Gallia, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota.

Bio Page
http://www.hist.umn.edu/people/profile.php?UID=abgallia
Email
abgallia@umn.edu

Professor Gallia specializes in Roman cultural memory and has articles published in CQ, JRS, and TAPA. He is in th process of completing his first book, titled Remembering the Republic: Culture, Politics, and History at Rome, AD 68-117.

Ömür Harmanşah, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World of Brown University.

Bio Page
http://proteus.brown.edu/harmansah/Home
Email
Omur_Harmansah@brown.edu

Professor Harmanşah teaches and works on the archaeology of the ancient Near East, particularly Mesopotamia, Syria, and Anatolia. His research interests are increasingly focused on the intersections of landscape and place, collective memory and spatial practices.

Lothar Haselberger, Ph.D.

Morris Russell and Josephine Chidsey Williams Professor in Roman Architecture, Graduate Group in Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World, University of Pennsylvania.

Bio Page
http://www.arthistory.upenn.edu/aamw/faculty.html#haselberger
Email
haselber@sas.upenn.edu

Professor Haselberger’s research interests are focused on the exploration of Greco-Roman Architecture in its practical and theoretical implications, from millimeter-refinements of ancient stone-carving to “macroscopic” aspects of urbanism, from the documentation of ancient construction drawings (focusing on the Temple of Apollo at Didyma, Turkey, and the Pantheon in Rome) to analyzing theories of design, visibility, and city building in the writings of Philo of Byzantium, Vitruvius, and others.

Currently, he is specially interested in the modes and media in the ancient transmission of design, the changes and ruptures in that tradition, and the literal application of Vitruvian “design recipes” now tangible in major temples (Didyma temple; Augustus‘ Temple of Mars Ultor; Hadrian‘s Pantheon) and cities (Pergamon; Alexandria).

Eric J. Kondratieff, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Western Kentucky University

Bio Page
http://www.wku.edu/history/faculty-staff.php
Email
eric.kondratieff@wku.edu

Professor Kondratieff's research interests include Greek and Roman historiography, epigraphy and economy.

Thomas J. Morton, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Arizona State University

Bio Page
http://design.asu.edu/directory/selectone.php?ID=4741
Email
thomas.morton@asu.edu

Professor Morton specializes in the architecture and urbanism of the Roman Empire, he has conducted archaeological fieldwork in Carthage, Tunisia, on the island of Jerba in Tunisia, and at Villa Magna, Italy.

Carlos F. Noreña, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley

Bio Page
http://history.berkeley.edu/faculty/Norena/
Email
norena@berkeley.edu

Professor Noreña works on the history of the Roman empire, and is currently finishing a book on the figure of the Roman emperor as a unifying symbol for the western empire. Other interests include the topography of Rome, imperial ideology, and comparative empires.

Todd W. Parment

Todd Parment is now a Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. Department of State

Building on his academic background and love for Italy, he previously served in Rome, Italy. As of June 2009, Todd is posted to Ankara, Turkey.

Guido Petruccioli

Mr. Petruccioli is presently a doctoral candidate at St. Cross College, St. Giles, Oxford University.

David Gilman Romano, Ph.D.

Director - Archaeological Mapping Lab, University of Arizona

Bio Page
http://davidgilmanromano.org
Email
davidgilmanromano@gmail.com

Dr. David Gilman Romano is the Karabots Professor of Greek Archaeology, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona. He has been involved in archaeological work in Greece for 35 years and is a specialist in the Ancient Olympic Games, Greek and Roman cities and sanctuaries, ancient surveying, and modern cartographic and survey techniques to reveal and study ancient sites. He has directed the Corinth Computer Project since 1988, and he is the Director of the Archaeological Mapping Lab in the School of Anthropology. Dr. Romano is the Field Director and Co-Director of the Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project, a founding member of the Parrhasian Heritage Park and Director of the Digital Augustan Rome project.

Nicholas L. Stapp, Ph.D.

Director, Geospatial Research - Archaeological Mapping Lab, University of Arizona

Bio Page
http://archaeologicalmappinglab.org

Dr. Nicholas L. Stapp is the Director of Geospatial Research at the Archaeological Mapping Lab at the University of Arizona. Prior to completing his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning, he earned a Master’s degree in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and a Bachelor’s degree in Archaeology from University College London. His research combines elements of urban planning/design, preservation, cultural heritage and archaeology with technological innovation to better understand the complex relationship between historic and modern space and place. Analysis of this relationship has guided the development of new research methodologies and spawned the creation of innovative research tools. Dr. Stapp has applied these approaches on projects in both the European Union and the United States.

Alexander G. Thein, Ph.D.

Lecturer, University College Dublin

Bio Page
http://www.ucd.ie/classics/staff/dralexanderthein/
Email
alexander.thein@ucd.ie

Dr. Thein‘s research focuses on Roman Republican History, especially Sulla‘s dictatorship and proscriptions. He also specializes in the topography of the city of Rome and the Roman Campagna.

Kevin Tracy, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Lawrence University

Bio Page
http://www.lawrence.edu/dept/classics/faculty/
Email
kevin.tracy@lawrence.edu

Professor Tracy's research centers on ancient philosophy, primarily Hellenistic philosophy.

Günder Varinlioğlu, Ph.D.

Dr. Varinlioğlu completed her studies in 2008 from the Graduate Group in Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World, University of Pennsylvania.

Her dissertation is titled “The Rural Landscape and Built Environment at the End of Antiquity: The Limestone Villages of Southeastern Isauria.”